Author: Boland, M.J.
Paper Title Page
THPAF037 Bunch Compression and Turnaround Loops Design in the FCC-ee Injector Complex 3044
 
  • T.K. Charles, F. Zimmermann
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M.J. Boland
    CLS, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • K. Oide
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
 
  The Future Circular e+e Collider (FCC-ee) requires two 180-degree turnaround loops to transport the positron beam from the damping ring to the lower energy section of the linac. In addition bunch compression is required to reduce the RMS bunch length from 5 mm to 0.5 mm, prior to injection into the linac. A dogleg bunch compressor comprised of two triple bend achromat (TBAs) can achieve this compression. Sextupole magnets are incorporated into the bunch compressor design for chromaticity correction as well as optimisation of the second-order longitudinal dispersion, T566, and to linearize the longitudinal phase space distribution. In this paper we present the design of the transport line and the bunch compressor. Measures to limit emittance growth due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) are also discussed, because despite the relatively long bunch length, the large degree of bending required introduces cause for consideration of CSR.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAF037  
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THPML130 Applications of a Distributed Beam Loss Monitor at the Australian Synchrotron 4986
SUSPF097   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • P.J. Giansiracusa, T.G. Lucas, R.P. Rassool, M. Volpi
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • M.J. Boland
    CLS, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • G. LeBlanc
    SLSA, Clayton, Australia
 
  A distributed beam loss monitoring system, based on Cherenkov silica fibres, has been installed at the Australian Synchrotron. The fibres are installed parallel to the beam pipe and cover the majority of the injection system and storage ring. Relativistic charged particles from beam loss events that have a velocity above the Cherenkov threshold produce photons in the fibres. These photons are then guided along the fibres to detectors outside of the accelerator tunnels. Originally the system was installed to determine its suitability for measuring losses at a future linear collider, such as the Compact Linear Collider, with single pass 150 ns bunch trains. This study builds on these results and attempts to use the system to measure loss locations with a circulating beam. We present the preliminary results and describe how the system could be improved.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML130  
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FRYGB4
IPAC'19 Chair Closing Slides  
 
  • M.J. Boland
    CLS, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
 
  IPAC'19 Chair Closing Slides  
slides icon Slides FRYGB4 [24.718 MB]  
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THPMK103 Initial Testing of Techniques for Large Scale Rf Conditioning for the Compact Linear Collider 4548
SUSPF019   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • T.G. Lucas, M.J. Boland, P.J. Giansiracusa, R.P. Rassool, M. Volpi
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • N. Catalán Lasheras, A. Grudiev, T. Lefèvre, G. McMonagle, I. Syratchev, B.J. Woolley, W. Wuensch, V. del Pozo Romano
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J. Paszkiewicz
    University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • C. Serpico
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • A. Vnuchenko
    IFIC, Valencia, Spain
  • R. Zennaro
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
 
  Nominal operating conditions for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) 380 GeV requires 72 MV/m loaded accelerating gradients for a 180 ns flat-top pulse. Achieving this requires extensive RF conditioning which past tests have demonstrated can take several months per structure, when conditioned at the nominal repetition rate of 50 Hz. At CERN there are three individual X-band test stands currently operational, testing up to 6 structures concurrently. For CLIC's 380 GeV design, 28,000 accelerating structures will make up the main linac. For a large scale conditioning programme, it is important to understand the RF conditioning process and to optimise the time taken for conditioning. In this paper, we review recent X-band testing results from CERN's test stands. With these results we investigate how to optimise the conditioning process and demonstrate the feasibility of pre-conditioning the structures at a higher repetition rate before installation into the main linac.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPMK103  
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THPMK104 High Power and High Repetition Rate X-band Power Source Using Multiple Klystrons 4552
 
  • M. Volpi, M.J. Boland, P.J. Giansiracusa, T.G. Lucas, R.P. Rassool
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • N. Catalán Lasheras, A. Grudiev, G. McMonagle, I. Syratchev, B.J. Woolley, W. Wuensch, V. del Pozo Romano
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J. Paszkiewicz
    University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • C. Serpico
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • A. Vnuchenko
    IFIC, Valencia, Spain
 
  In July 2016, the first X-band test facility operating with two interwoven, 6 MW klystron pulses was commissioned at CERN. Outputting up to 46 MW after pulse compression, the new test stand allows testing of two structures concurrently with repetition rates up to 400 Hz in each line. RF commissioning of all four lines has been completed and testing of high gradient accelerating structures for the Compact Linear Collider has commenced. Operations have been ongoing for more than a year, where dedicated control algorithms have been developed to conditioning the structure and to keep the pulse compressors tuned. Significant progress has been made in understanding the conditioning of two structures that are sharing an interlock and vacuum system. The high repetition rate is already showing the significantly reduced time needed to condition accelerating structures.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPMK104  
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