Author: Bruce, R.
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MOPMF038 Cleaning Performance of the Collimation System with Xe Beams at the Large Hadron Collider 176
 
  • N. Fuster-Martínez, R. Bruce, P.D. Hermes, J.M. Jowett, D. Mirarchi, S. Redaelli
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The LHC heavy-ion program with Pb ions has delivered substantial physics results since the startup of the LHC. There was a Xe run in 2017 in which collimation losses and cleaning were assessed. These studies give a unique opportunity for very valuable benchmark of simulation models with measurements, which could also be very important to understand limitations for future runs with Pb and other species. In this paper, we present collimation loss maps measured in the first ever operation of the LHC with Xe ions. The measurements are compared with simulations and first conclusions are discussed for possible future operation.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF038  
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MOPMF039 First Xenon-Xenon Collisions in the LHC 180
 
  • M. Schaumann, R. Alemany-Fernández, P. Baudrenghien, T. Bohl, C. Bracco, R. Bruce, N. Fuster-Martínez, M.A. Jebramcik, J.M. Jowett, T. Mertens, D. Mirarchi, S. Redaelli, B. Salvachua, M. Solfaroli, H. Timko, J. Wenninger
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  In 2017, the CERN accelerator complex once again demonstrated its flexibility by producing beams of a new ion species, xenon, that were successfully injected into LHC. On 12 October, collisions of fully stripped xenon nuclei were recorded for the first time in the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy per colliding nucleon pair of 5.44 TeV. Physics data taking started 9.5 h after the first injection of xenon beams and lasted a total of 6 h. The integrated luminosity delivered to the four LHC experiments was sufficient that new physics results can be expected soon. We provide a general overview of this Xe-Xe pilot run before focussing on beam data at injection energy and at flat-top.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF039  
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MOPMF048 Aperture Measurements with AC Dipole at the Large Hadron Collider 212
 
  • N. Fuster-Martínez, R. Bruce, J. Dilly, E.H. Maclean, T. Persson, S. Redaelli, R. Tomás
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • L.J. Nevay
    Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, United Kingdom
 
  Global aperture measurements are crucial for a safe operation and to push the performance of the LHC, in particular, the knowledge of aperture at top energy allows pushing the optics to reduce the colliding beam sizes. The standard method used in the LHC commissioning requires using several bunches for one measurement and makes bunches un-usable for other activities. This paper presents first global aperture measurements performed at injection with a new method using the AC dipole. This method consists in exciting large coherent oscillations of the beam without spoiling its emittance. A gentle control of the oscillation amplitude enables re-using the beams for several measurements. These measurements are compared with aperture measurements performed using the standard method and possible benefits, for example for optics measurements, at top energy with squeezed optics, are elaborated.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF048  
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MOPMF053 Observations, Analysis and Mitigation of Recurrent LHC Beam Dumps Caused by Fast Losses in Arc Half-Cell 16L2 228
 
  • J.M. Jimenez, D. Amorim, S. A. Antipov, G. Arduini, A. Bertarelli, N. Biancacci, B. Bradu, E. Bravin, G. Bregliozzi, K. Brodzinski, R. Bruce, X. Buffat, L.R. Carver, P. Chiggiato, S.D. Claudet, P. Collier, R. Garcia Alia, M. Giovannozzi, L. K. Grob, E.B. Holzer, W. Höfle, G. Iadarola, G. Kotzian, A. Lechner, T.E. Levens, B. Lindstrom, T. Medvedeva, A. Milanese, D. Mirarchi, E. Métral, D. Perini, S. Redaelli, G. Rumolo, B. Salvant, R. Schmidt, M. Valette, D. Valuch, J. Wenninger, D. Wollmann, C. Yin Vallgren, C. Zamantzas, M. Zerlauth
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • D. Amorim
    Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France
  • A.A. Gorzawski
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • L. Mether
    EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
 
  Recurrent beam dumps significantly perturbed the operation of the CERN LHC in the summer months of 2017, especially in August. These unexpected beam dumps were triggered by fast beam losses that built up in the cryogenic beam vacuum at the half-cell 16 left of LHC-IP2 and were detected either at that location but mainly in the collimation insertions. This contribution details the experimental observables (beam losses, coherent instabilities, heat load to cryogenic system, vacuum signals), the extent of the understanding of the beam loss and instability mechanisms and the mitigation steps and new settings that allowed recovering the luminosity performance of the LHC for the rest of the Run.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF053  
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MOPMF064 High-Energy LHC Design 269
 
  • F. Zimmermann, D. Amorim, S. A. Antipov, S. Arsenyev, M. Benedikt, R. Bruce, M.P. Crouch, S.D. Fartoukh, M. Giovannozzi, B. Goddard, M. Hofer, R. Kersevan, V. Mertens, Y. Muttoni, J.A. Osborne, V. Parma, V. Raginel, S. Redaelli, T. Risselada, I. Ruehl, B. Salvant, D. Schoerling, E.N. Shaposhnikova, L.J. Tavian, E. Todesco, R. Tomás, D. Tommasini, F. Valchkova-Georgieva, V. Venturi, D. Wollmann
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J.L. Abelleira, E. Cruz Alaniz, P. Martinez Mirave, A. Seryi, L. van Riesen-Haupt
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • A. Apyan
    ANSL, Yerevan, Armenia
  • J. Barranco García, L. Mether, T. Pieloni, L. Rivkin, C. Tambasco
    EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • F. Burkart
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • Y. Cai, Y.M. Nosochkov
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
  • G. Guillermo Cantón
    CINVESTAV, Mérida, Mexico
  • K. Ohmi, K. Oide, D. Zhou
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
 
  In the frame of the FCC study we are designing a 27 TeV hadron collider in the LHC tunnel, called the High Energy LHC (HE-LHC).  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF064  
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MOPML012 Special Collimation System Configuration for the LHC High-Beta Runs 418
 
  • H. Garcia Morales
    Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, United Kingdom
  • R. Bruce, H. Burkhardt, M. Deile, S. Jakobsen, A. Mereghetti, S. Redaelli
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Special LHC high-beta optics is required for the forward physics program of TOTEM and ATLAS-ALFA. In this configuration, the beam is de-squeezed (the \beta-function at the collision point is increased) in order to minimize the divergence for measurements at very small scattering angles. In these low beam intensity runs, it is important to place the Roman Pots (RPs) as close as possible to the beam, which demands special collimator settings. During Run I, a significant amount of background was observed in the forward detectors due to particles outscattered from the primary collimator. During Run II, a different collimation configuration was used where a tungsten collimator was used as primary collimator instead of the usual one made of carbon. Using this configuration, a significant reduction of the background at the RPs was observed. In this paper we present a description of the new collimator configuration and the results obtained during the high-beta run carried out in 2016.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPML012  
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TUPAF059 Design and Evaluation of FCC-hh Injection Protection Schemes 854
 
  • E. Renner, M.J. Barnes, W. Bartmann, C. Bracco, R. Bruce, F. Burkart, B. Goddard, A. Lechner, L.S. Stoel, F.M. Velotti, C. Wiesner, D. Woog
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Future Circular Collider (FCC) study considers several injector scenarios for FCC-hh, the proposed 100~TeV centre of mass hadron collider located at CERN. The investigated options include amongst others to use the LHC at 3.3~TeV or a superconducting SPS at 1.3~TeV as a High Energy Booster (HEB). Due to the high energy of the injected proton beam and the short time constant of injection failures, a thorough consideration of potential failure cases is of major importance. Further attention has to be given to the fact that the injection is - as in LHC - located upstream of the side experiments. Failure scenarios are identified for both injector options, appropriate designs of injection protection schemes are proposed and first simulations are conducted to validate the protection efficiency.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPAF059  
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WEYGBE4 Low-Impedance Collimators for HL-LHC 1794
 
  • S. A. Antipov, N. Biancacci, R. Bruce, A. Mereghetti, D. Mirarchi, E. Métral, S. Redaelli, B. Salvant
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • D. Amorim
    Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France
 
  The High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will double its beam intensity for the needs of High Energy Physics frontier. This increase requires a reduction of the machine's impedance to ensure the coherent stability of the beams until they are put in collision. A major part of the impedance is the resistive wall contribution of the collimators. To reduce this contribution several coating options have been proposed. We have studied numerically the effect of the novel coatings on the beam stability. The results show that a decrease of up to 30% of the machine impedance and a reduction of up to 120 A in the stabilizing octupole current threshold can be achieved by coating the secondary collimators with Molybdenum. Half of that improvement can be obtained by coating the jaws of a subset of four collimators identified as the highest contributors to machine impedance. The installation of this subset of low-impedance collimators is planned for the Long Shutdown 2 in 2019-2020.  
slides icon Slides WEYGBE4 [5.724 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-WEYGBE4  
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