Author: Bylinskii, Y.
Paper Title Page
MOXGB2 ARIEL at TRIUMF: Science and Technology 6
 
  • J.A. Bagger, F. Ames, Y. Bylinskii, A. Gottberg, O.K. Kester, S.R. Koscielniak, R.E. Laxdal, M. Marchetto, P. Schaffer
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Hayashi
    TRIUMF Innovations Inc., Vancouver, Canada
 
  The Advanced Rare Isotope Laboratory (ARIEL) is TRIUMF's flagship project to create isotopes for science, medicine and business. ARIEL will triple TRIUMF's rare isotope beam capability, enabling more and new experiments in materials science, nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental symmetries, as well as the development of new isotopes for the life sciences. Beams from ARIEL's new 35 MeV, 100kW electron linear accelerator and from TRIUMF's original 500 MeV cyclotron will enable breakthrough experiments with the laboratory's suite of world-class experiments at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. This invited talk will present an overview of TRIUMF, the ARIEL project, and the exciting science they enable.  
slides icon Slides MOXGB2 [65.009 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOXGB2  
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TUPAL062 Recent Developments for Cyclotron Extraction Foils at TRIUMF 1159
 
  • Y. Bylinskii, R.A. Baartman, P.E. Dirksen, Y.-N. Rao, V.A. Verzilov
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: Funded under a contribution agreement with NRC (National Research Council Canada).
The TRIUMF 500 MeV H− cyclotron employs stripping foils to extract multiple beams for different experimental programs. The upgrades in foil material and foil holders lead to significant improvements in beam quality and foil life time, as well as reduction of Be-7 contamination originated in the foils. Thus, an accumulated beam charge extracted with a single foil increased from ~60 mA·hours to more than 500 mA·hours. A key role that lead to these advances was an understanding of the foil heating mechanism, major contribution to which is paid by the power deposition from electrons stripped by the foil. To further diminish this effect, we recently introduced a foil tilt from the vertical orientation that allows stripped electrons fast escape from the foil, well before losing their original momentum through the heat deposition. Other improvements were related to operational issues. Introduction of a "combo" foil consisting of wide portion and thin wire allowed both high and low intensity beam extraction without foils sacrifice. Deploying a wedge foil for extraction at 100 MeV helped reduction of beam intensity instabilities caused by beam vertical size and position fluctuations.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPAL062  
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TUPMK011 Single Ring Permanent Magnet Lens 1513
 
  • K. Jayamanna, R.A. Baartman, Y. Bylinskii, T. Planche
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Corwin
    UW/Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • R.N. Simpson
    UBC, Vancouver, B.C., Canada
 
  Funding: TRIUMF receives its funding from the National Research Council of Canada.
A permanent magnet lens has been designed to be a non-powered alternative to solenoids for low energy beam transport. The lens consists of a single ring of 12 sectors, each sector with poles directed inward. This forms an axial field that reverses sign at the midpoint, somewhat like two opposing short solenoids. It is similar to the Iwashita lens* but consists of only one ring, not two. A prototype lens optimized to decrease the magnetic material required while also reducing aberration, has been built and tested for a 25 keV H-minus beam. Emittance figures measured downstream of the lens are compared with theory.
* Y. Iwashita, "Axial Magnetic Field Lens with Permanent Magnet", Proc. PAC 1993, p.3154.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPMK011  
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THPAK104 New Proton Driver Beamline Design for ARIEL* Project at TRIUMF** 3473
 
  • Y.-N. Rao, R.A. Baartman, Y. Bylinskii, F.W. Jones
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: ∗ Capital funding from CFI (Canada Foundation for Innovation). ** Funded under a contribution agreement with NRC (National Research Council Canada).
The new radioisotope facility at TRIUMF, ARIEL, under construction, comprises two primary driver beams: 50 MeV electrons from the SC linac and 480 MeV protons from the main TRIUMF cyclotron. New 80 m long proton beam line will transport up to 100 microamps beam from existing cyclotron extraction port to an ISOL target station. H− cyclotron stripping foil extraction allows to feed this additional user simultaneously with 3 present different experimental programs. Distinctive features of the new beam line include: a) compensation of the cyclotron energy dispersion; b) low-loss (< 1 nA/m) beam transport after a collimator dedicated to remove the beam halo produced by large-angle scattering in the extraction foil; c) broad range of beam size variability at the production target by applying beam rastering at 400 Hz; d) sharing the same tunnel with electron beam line that requires unique beam loss protect system. Details of beam optics design as well as beam instrumentation are discussed in the paper.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAK104  
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THPAL062 The New 20 kA 80 V Power Supply for the 520 MeV H Cyclotron at TRIUMF 3792
 
  • S. Carrozza, L. Bondesan, A. Morato, M.P. Pretelli, G.T. Taddia
    OCEM, Valsamoggia, Italy
  • M.C. Bastos, J.-P. Burnet, G. Hudson, Q. King, G. Le Godec, O. Michels
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Y. Bylinskii, A.C.M. Leung, W. L. Louie, F. Mammarella, R.B. Nussbaumer, C. Valencia
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The new 20 kA, 80 V power supply for the main magnet of the 520 MeV H Cyclotron at TRIUMF was awarded to OCEM. It has replaced the original system (commissioned in 1976) based on a series pass regulator. The final acceptance tests have demonstrated the com-pliance with the project specifications, especially for the high current stability required for the Cyclotron operation. The current stability is ±5 ppm, including current ripple, for a period of more than 8 hours of continuous operation. In addition, the magnetic field can be further stabilized us-ing feedback of a flux loop signal. OCEM designed the power supply to use the third gen-eration of Function Generator/Controller (FGC3) control electronics from CERN. This was chosen to obtain the high current stability required by TRIUMF. This collaboration was facilitated through a Knowledge Transfer agreement between CERN and OCEM. The power supply commis-sioning has been performed as a collaboration between OCEM, TRIUMF and CERN. This paper describes the topology of the power supply, the control electronics, the high-precision current measure-ment system and the associated software as well as the commissioning results carried out with the magnet.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL062  
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THPAL115 The Design of 1.1 MW RF Dummy Load for the RF System of 520 MeV Cyclotron 3911
 
  • N.V. Avreline, Y. Bylinskii, B. Jakovljevic, Y. Ma, V. Zvyagintsev
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The RF System of 520-MeV Cyclotron is operating at 23 MHz with 1 MW CW RF power. The RF dummy load is required to troubleshoot and tune the RF amplifier. The RF system is being constantly improved and the future goal is to increase cyclotron's beam current up to 400 μA, which requires increasing the RF amplifier's power. As a part of this goal, a new RF dummy load was designed.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL115  
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THPAL120 Cryogenics Infrastructure at TRIUMF's Particle Accelerator Facilities 3925
 
  • A.N. Koveshnikov, Y. Bylinskii, G.W. Hodgson, D. Kishi, R.E. Laxdal, R.R. Nagimov, D. Yosifov
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.
Cryogenic infrastructure is an indispensable part of TRIUMF accelerator facilities. At the moment TRIUMF operates three helium cryogenic systems supporting operation of three major accelerator systems: 520 MeV proton cyclotron, superconductive radio-frequency (SRF) heavy ion linear accelerator at the Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) facility, and SRF electron linear accelerator (e-linac) at Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL). Applications of cryogenic thermal loads vary from cryogenic absorption pumping of the cyclotron vacuum tank to cryogenic cooling of superconducting (SC) RF cavities of production accelerators and support of research and development at SRF department. Wide range of production techniques for cryogenic refrigeration includes helium refrigerators based on both piston and turbine expansion coldboxes for both 4 K and 2 K temperature cryogenic loads. This paper presents the details of TRIUMF cryogenic systems as well as operational experience of various cryogenic installations.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL120  
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THPAL121 The Operational Experience of E-Linac Cryogenic System at TRIUMF 3928
 
  • R.R. Nagimov, Y. Bylinskii, D. Kishi, S.R. Koscielniak, A.N. Koveshnikov, R.E. Laxdal, D. Yosifov
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: ARIEL is funded by CFI, the Provinces of AB, BC, MA, ON, QC, and TRIUMF. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.
The new Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major expansion of the Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) facility at TRIUMF. Superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities cooled down to 2 K are the key part of ARIEL electron linear accelerator (e-linac). Design of the cryogenic system was bound to follow both phased project schedule and existing building infrastructure. Due to the scheduling of commissioning and R&D activities of ARIEL project, high availability requirements were set for e-linac cryogenic system during its commissioning stage. Various upgrades were introduced during system commissioning in order to improve overall availability and reliability of the system. This paper presents the details of operational experience, commissioning activities and continuous improvement of various operational aspects of e-linac cryogenic system.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL121  
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THPML080 Preliminary Results of a New High Brightness H Ion Source Developed at TRIUMF 4839
 
  • K. Jayamanna, F. Ames, Y. Bylinskii, J.Y. Cheng, M. Lovera, M. Minato
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  This paper describes the preliminary results of a high brightness ion source developed at TRIUMF, which is capable of producing a negative hydrogen ion beam (H) of up to 5 mA of direct current. A 1.7 mm.mrad and 5 mm.mrad emittance(rms) is achieved for 500 uA and for 1 mA H-, respectively. Characteristics as well as a brief description regarding extraction issues of the source to date are also presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML080  
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