Author: Cultrera, L.
Paper Title Page
MOPMF013 eRHIC EIC: Plans for Rapid Acceleration of Polarized Electron Bunch at Cornell Synchrotron 108
 
  • F. Méot, E.C. Aschenauer, H. Huang, C. Montag, V. Ptitsyn, V.H. Ranjbar, E. Wang, Z. Zhao
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I.V. Bazarov, D. L. Rubin
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • L. Cultrera, G.H. Hoffstaetter, K.W. Smolenski, R.M. Talman
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • D. Gaskell, O. Glamazdin, J.M. Grames
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
An option as an injector into the polarized-electron storage ring of eRHIC EIC is a rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS). Cornell's 10 GeV RCS injector to CESR presents a good opportunity for dedicated polarized bunch rapid-acceleration experiments, it can also serve as a test bed for source and polarimetry developments in the frame of the EIC R&D, as polarized bunch experiments require disposing of a polarized electron source, and of dedicated polarimetry in the linac region and in the RCS proper. This is as well an opportunity for a pluri-disciplinary collaboration between Laboratories. This paper is an introduction to the topic, and to on-going activities towards that EIC R&D project.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF013  
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TUYGBE2 CBETA, the 4-Turn ERL with SRF and Single Return Loop 635
 
  • G.H. Hoffstaetter, N. Banerjee, J. Barley, A.C. Bartnik, I.V. Bazarov, D.C. Burke, J.A. Crittenden, L. Cultrera, J. Dobbins, S.J. Full, F. Furuta, R.E. Gallagher, M. Ge, C.M. Gulliford, B.K. Heltsley, R.P.K. Kaplan, V.O. Kostroun, Y. Li, M. Liepe, W. Lou, C.E. Mayes, J.R. Patterson, P. Quigley, D.M. Sabol, D. Sagan, J. Sears, C.H. Shore, E.N. Smith, K.W. Smolenski, V. Veshcherevich, D. Widger
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • J.S. Berg, S.J. Brooks, C. Liu, G.J. Mahler, F. Méot, R.J. Michnoff, M.G. Minty, S. Peggs, V. Ptitsyn, T. Roser, P. Thieberger, D. Trbojevic, N. Tsoupas, J.E. Tuozzolo, F.J. Willeke, H. Witte
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • D. Douglas
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • J.K. Jones
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • D. Jusic
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • D.J. Kelliher
    STFC/RAL/ASTeC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, United Kingdom
  • B.C. Kuske, M. McAteer, J. Völker
    HZB, Berlin, Germany
 
  Funding: Supported by NSF award DMR-0807731, DOE grant DE-AC02-76SF00515, and NYSERDA.
A collaboration between Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory has designed and is constructing CBETA, the Cornell-BNL ERL Test Accelerator on the Cornell campus. The ERL technology that has been prototyped at Cornell for many years is being used for this new accelerator, including a DC electron source and an SRF injector Linac with world-record current and normalized brightness in a bunch train, a high-current linac cryomodule optimized for ERLs, a high-power beam stop, and several diagnostics tools for high-current and high-brightness beams. BNL has designed multi-turn ERLs for several purpose, dominantly for the electron beam of eRHIC, its Electron Ion Collider (EIC) project and for the associated fast electron cooling system. Also in JLEIC, the EIC designed at JLAB, an ERL is envisioned to be used for electron cooling. The number of transport lines in an ERL is minimized by using return arcs that are comprised of a Fixed Field Alternating-gradient (FFA) design. This technique will be tested in CBETA, which has a single return for the 4-beam energies with strongly-focusing permanent magnets of Halbach type. The high-brightness beam with 150~MeV and up to 40~mA will have applications beyond accelerator research, in industry, in nuclear physics, and in X-ray science. Low current electron beam has already been sent through the most relevant parts of CBETA, from the DC gun through both cryomodules, through one of the 8 similar separator lines, and through one of the 27 similar FFA structures. Further construction is envisioned to lead to a commissioning start for the full system early in 2019.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUYGBE2  
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TUPML025 Long Lifetime Spin-Polarized GaAs Photocathode Activated by Cs2Te 1589
SUSPF049   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • J. Bae, L. Cultrera, P. Digiacomo
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • I.V. Bazarov
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Nos. DE-SC0016203 and NSF PHY-1461111.
High intensity and highly spin-polarized electron source is of great interest to the next generation Electron Ion Colliders. GaAs prepared by the standard activation method, which is the most widely used spin-polarized photocathode, is notorious for its vacuum sensitivity and short operational lifetime. To improve the lifetime of GaAs photocathodes, we activated GaAs by Cs2Te, a material well known for its robustness. We confirmed the Cs2Te layer forms negative electron affinity on GaAs with a factor of 5 improvement in lifetime. Furthermore, the new activation method had no adverse effect on spin-polarization. Considering Cs2Te forms much thicker activation layer (~ 2 nm) compared to the standard activation layer (~ monolayer), our results trigger a paradigm shift on new activation methods with other robust materials that were avoided for their thickness.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML025  
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TUPML026 Multi-photon Photoemission and Ultrafast Electron Heating in Cu Photocathodes at Threshold 1593
 
  • J. Bae, L. Cultrera
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • I.V. Bazarov, J.M. Maxson
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • S.S. Karkare, H.A. Padmore
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
  • P. Musumeci, X.L. Shen
    UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
 
  Funding: U.S. National Science Foundation under award PHY-1549132, the Center for Bright Beams.
Operating photocathodes near the photoemission threshold holds the promise of yielding small intrinsic emittance, at the cost of significantly reduced quantum efficiency. In modern femtosecond photoemission electron sources, this requires a very high intensity (10s of GW/cm2) to extract a useful quantity of electrons. At this intensity, the electron occupation function is far from equilibrium and evolves rapidly on sub-ps timescales. Thus, ultrafast laser heating and multiphoton photoemission effects may play a significant role in emission, thereby increasing the minimum achievable emittance. In this work, we use a Boltzmann equation approach to calculate the non-equilibrium occupation function evolution in time for a copper photocathode, yielding a prediction of quantum efficiency and mean transverse energy as a function of input intensity.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML026  
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TUPML027 Barium Tin Oxide Ordered Photocathodes: First Measurements and Future Perspectives 1597
 
  • A. Galdi, E. B. Lochocki, H. Paik, C.T. Parzyck, D. G. Schlom, K.M. Shen
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
  • G. Adhikari, W.A. Schroeder
    UIC, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • I.V. Bazarov, L. Cultrera, W. H. Li, J.M. Maxson, C. M. Pierce
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Award PHY-1549132, the Center for Bright Beams.
Single crystalline photocathodes with small electron effective mass are supposed to enable ultra-low emittance beams, by taking advantage of the conservation of transverse (crystal) momentum. We present a preliminary study on photoemission from epitaxial films of La-doped BaSnO3 with (100) orientation. We demonstrate here the possibility of generating and characterizing electron beams by exciting photoelectrons solely from the conduction band. We report quantum efficiency and mean transverse energy meaurements as a function of photon energy from the bare and Cs-activated La-doped BaSnO3 surface.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML027  
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TUPML028 Photocathodes R&D for High Brightness and Highly Polarized Electron Beams at Cornell University 1601
 
  • L. Cultrera, J. Bae, A.C. Bartnik, I.V. Bazarov, R. Doane, A. Galdi, C.M. Gulliford, W. H. Li, J.M. Maxson, S.A. McBride, T.P. Moore, C. M. Pierce, C. Xu
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
 
  Cornell University is a leader in the development of photocathode materials for the production of high brightness electron beam sources for applications in large scale accelerators and small scale electron scattering experiments. During the last year we have also included Mott polarimetry to investigate long lifetime spin-polarized photocathodes materials. Another thrust of our laboratory is the exploration of ultra low emittance photocathodes at cryogenic temperatures, for which we are building a novel LHe cryogenic electron source. We will review updates from our lab across each of these areas.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML028  
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