Author: Edelen, J.P.
Paper Title Page
THYGBF2 PIP-II Injector Test Warm Front End: Commissioning Update 2943
 
  • L.R. Prost, R. Andrews, C.M. Baffes, J.-P. Carneiro, B.E. Chase, A.Z. Chen, E. Cullerton, P. Derwent, J.P. Edelen, J. Einstein-Curtis, D. Frolov, B.M. Hanna, D.W. Peterson, G.W. Saewert, A. Saini, V.E. Scarpine, A.V. Shemyakin, V.L. Sista, J. Steimel, D. Sun, A. Warner
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • C.J. Richard
    NSCL, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
  • V.L. Sista
    BARC, Mumbai, India
 
  Funding: This manuscript has been authored by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics
The Warm Front End (WFE) of the Proton Improvement Plan II Injector Test [1] at Fermilab has been constructed to its full length. It includes a 15-mA DC, 30-keV H ion source, a 2 m-long Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) with a switching dipole magnet, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, followed by a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) with various diagnostics and a dump. This report presents the commissioning status, focusing on beam measurements in the MEBT. In particular, a beam with the parameters required for injection into the Booster (5 mA, 0.55 ms macro-pulse at 20 Hz) was transported through the WFE.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THYGBF2  
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THPMF025 Emittance Measurements at FAST Facility 4100
 
  • J. Ruan, D.R. Broemmelsiek, D.J. Crawford, A.L. Edelen, J.P. Edelen, D.R. Edstrom, A.H. Lumpkin, P. Piot, A.L. Romanov, R.M. Thurman-Keup
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • P. Piot
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: *Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.
The FAST facility at Fermilab recently been commissioned has demonstrated the generation of electron beam within a wide range of parameter (energy, charge) suitable for accelerator-science and beam-physics experiments. This accelerator consists of a photo-electron gun, injector, ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam-lines. It will mainly serve as injector for the upcoming Integrable Optical Test Accelerator (IOTA). At the same time we will also carry out a LINAC based intense gamma ray experiment based on the Inverse Compton scattering. It is essential to understand the beam emittance for both experiments. A number of techniques are used to characaterizing the beam emittance including slit based method and quad scan method. An on-line emittance measurement based on multi-slit method is developed so the emittance measured will be immediately available to support further beam optimization. In this report we will present the results from the emittance studies using this tool. We will also present the emittance measurement based on quads scan technique for the high energy beam line.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPMF025  
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MOPML060 Self-Consistent Simulation and Optimization of Space-Charge Limited Thermionic Energy Converters 543
 
  • N.M. Cook, J.P. Edelen, C.C. Hall
    RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • J.-L. Vay
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics under Award Number DE-SC0017162.
Thermionic energy converters (TEC) are an attractive technology for modular, efficient transfer of heat to electrical energy. The steady-state dynamics of a TEC are a function of the emission characteristics of the cathode and anode, an array of intra-gap electrodes and dielectric structures, and the self-consistent dynamics of the electrons in the gap. Proper modeling of these devices requires self-consistent simulation of the electron interactions in the gap. We present results from simulations of these devices using the particle-in-cell code Warp, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. We consider the role of individual energy loss mechanisms in reducing device efficiency, including kinetic losses, radiative losses, and dielectric charging. We discuss the implementation of an external circuit model to provide realistic feedback. Lastly, we illustrate the potential to use nonlinear optimization to maximize the efficiency of these devices by examining grid transparency.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPML060  
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THYGBE2
Results and Discussion of Recent Applications of Neural Network-Based Approaches to the Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators  
 
  • A.L. Edelen
    CSU, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
  • S. Biedron
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA
  • D.L. Bowring, B.E. Chase, D.R. Edstrom, J. Steimel
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • J.P. Edelen
    RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • P.J.M. van der Slot
    Mesa+, Enschede, The Netherlands
 
  Here we highlight several examples from our work in applying neural network-based modeling and control techniques to particle accelerator systems, through a combination of simulation and experimental studies. We also discuss where the specific approaches used fit into the state of the art in deep learning for control, including limitations of the present state of the art (for example in efficiently dealing with noisy, time-varying, many-parameter systems, like those found in accelerators). We will also briefly clarify some of the terminology/taxonomy of artificial intelligence, and describe how the neural network approaches used here relate to other classes of algorithms that are familiar to the accelerator community. The particle accelerator applications discussed include resonant frequency control of Fermilab's PIP-II RFQ, fast switching between beam parameters in a compact THz FEL, modeling of the FAST low energy beamline at Fermilab, temperature control for the FAST RF gun, and trajectory control for the Jefferson Laboratory FEL.  
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THPAK082 Simulation of Perturbative Effects in IOTA 3422
 
  • C.C. Hall, D.L. Bruhwiler, N.M. Cook, J.P. Edelen, S.D. Webb
    RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, Colorado, USA
 
  The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is being commissioned at Fermi National Laboratory for study of the concept of nonlinear integrable optics. The use of a special nonlinear magnetic element introduces large tune spread with amplitude while constraining the idealized dynamics by two integrals of motion. The nonlinear element should provide suppression of instabilities through nonlinear decoherence. We examine the case of a bunch injected off-axis and the resulting damping of centroid oscillations from decoherence. A simple model of the damping is described and compared to simulation.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAK082  
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THPAK083 An s-Based Symplectic Spectral Space Charge Algorithm 3425
 
  • N.M. Cook, D.T. Abell, D.L. Bruhwiler, J.P. Edelen, C.C. Hall, S.D. Webb
    RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, Colorado, USA
 
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics under Award Number DE-SC001340.
Traditional finite-difference particle-in-cell methods for modeling self-consistent space charge introduce non-Hamiltonian effects that make long-term tracking in storage rings unreliable. Foremost of these is so-called grid heating. Particularly for studies where the Hamiltonian invariants are critical for understanding the beam dynamics, such as nonlinear integrable optics, these spurious effects make interpreting simulation results difficult. To remedy this, we present a symplectic spectral space charge algorithm that is free of non-Hamiltonian numerical effects and, therefore, suitable for long-term tracking studies. We present initial results demonstrating the implementation of the algorithm, using a spectral representation of the fields and macro particles to preserve Hamiltonian structures. We then discuss applications to the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA), currently under construction at Fermilab.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAK083  
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