Author: Gottberg, A.
Paper Title Page
MOXGB2 ARIEL at TRIUMF: Science and Technology 6
 
  • J.A. Bagger, F. Ames, Y. Bylinskii, A. Gottberg, O.K. Kester, S.R. Koscielniak, R.E. Laxdal, M. Marchetto, P. Schaffer
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Hayashi
    TRIUMF Innovations Inc., Vancouver, Canada
 
  The Advanced Rare Isotope Laboratory (ARIEL) is TRIUMF's flagship project to create isotopes for science, medicine and business. ARIEL will triple TRIUMF's rare isotope beam capability, enabling more and new experiments in materials science, nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental symmetries, as well as the development of new isotopes for the life sciences. Beams from ARIEL's new 35 MeV, 100kW electron linear accelerator and from TRIUMF's original 500 MeV cyclotron will enable breakthrough experiments with the laboratory's suite of world-class experiments at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. This invited talk will present an overview of TRIUMF, the ARIEL project, and the exciting science they enable.  
slides icon Slides MOXGB2 [65.009 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOXGB2  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
TUPAL061 Target and Ion Source Development for Better Beams in the ARIEL Era 1155
 
  • C. Babcock, T. Day Goodacre, A. Gottberg
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • A. Gottberg
    Victoria University, Victoria, B.C., Canada
 
  Any ISOL facility pushing the boundaries of nuclear physics must be able to provide cutting-edge ion beams to its users - beams of isotopes far from stability, with few contaminants, that may be difficult to extract from an ISOL target. The development of these pure, exotic beams must be supported by continuing research and development on targets and ion sources. In the ARIEL era, new target/ion source geometries and operational modes will provide new opportunities which can only be exploited with time for development. To prioritize this, TRIUMF proposes to build a dedicated test stand for target and ion source research which will model the critical features of the new ARIEL target stations. This stand will provide a testing ground for methods of increasing efficiency and selectivity, such as investigations of new surface ion source [1,2] and FEBIAD ion source [3] designs. In addition, this will provide a development environment for new beams, either from new target materials, or through techniques such as extracting molecular beams. In order to maximize the gain from these investigations in on-line operation, the ion optical properties of the final beam will be investigated concurrently.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPAL061  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
THPAL117 Development of a Proton-to-Neutron Converter for Radioisotope Production at ISAC-TRIUMF 3917
SUSPL088   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • L. Egoriti, P.G. Bricault, T. Day Goodacre, A. Gottberg
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Delonca, R.M. Dos Santos Augusto, J.P. Ramos, S. Rothe, T. Stora
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Dierckx, D. Houngbo, L. Popescu
    SCK•CEN, Mol, Belgium
  • R.M. Dos Santos Augusto
    LMU, München, Germany
 
  At ISAC-TRIUMF, a 500 MeV proton beam is impinged upon thick targets to induce nuclear reactions to pro-duce reaction products that are delivered as a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) to experiments. Uranium carbide is among the most commonly used target materials which produces a vast radionuclide inventory coming from both spallation and fission- events. This can also represent a major limitation for the successful delivery of certain RIBs to experiments since, for a given mass, many isobar-ic isotopes are to be filtered by the dipole mass separator. These contaminants can exceed the yield of the isotope of interest by orders of magnitude, often causing a significant reduction in the sensitivity of experiments or even making them impossible. The design of a 50 kW proton-to-neutron (p2n) converter-target is ongoing to enhance the production of neutron-rich nuclei while significantly reducing the rate of neutron-deficient contaminants. The converter is made out of a bulk tungsten block which converts proton beams into neutrons through spallation. The neutrons, in turn, induce pure fission in an upstream UCx target. The present target design and the service infrastructure needed for its operation will be discussed in this paper.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL117  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
THPMK094 Thermal Design of a 100 kW Electron to Gamma Converter at TRIUMF 4520
 
  • B.G. Cade, L. Egoriti, A. Gottberg
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • D.R. Priessl
    UVIC, Victoria, Canada
 
  The electron target station (AETE) of the TRIUMF-ARIEL Facility will employ an electron "driver" beam to irradiate Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) targets for the production of radioactive isotopes via photofission. 30 MeV electrons will be converted to gamma spectrum Bremsstrahlung photons via an electron to gamma (e-y) converter located upstream of the ISOL target. The e-y concept uses a composite metal with two layers: One high-Z material to convert electrons to photons, and one low-Z material to provide structural support, thermal dissipation, and maximal transparency to the produced gamma photons. Several material combinations and bonding processes are currently being evaluated and tested using TRIUMF's E-LINAC. Water-cooling and thermal design are being optimized for 100 kW operation and have thus far been validated up to 10 kW driver beam power. The latest test results and future prospects are summarized.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPMK094  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
THPML131 A NEW PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR UCx TARGETS FOR RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE BEAMS AT TRIUMF 4990
SUSPL087   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • M. S. Cervantes, P. Fouquet-Métivier, A. Gottberg, P. Kunz, L. Lambert, A. Mjøs, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. S. Cervantes
    UVIC, Victoria, Canada
  • P. Fouquet-Métivier
    ENSCM, Montpellier, France
  • A. Gottberg
    Victoria University, Victoria, B.C., Canada
 
  TRIUMF has the objective of producing radioactive isotope beams (RIB) using the ISOL method. Radioactive isotopes are used in experiments in different areas of science. At the TRIUMF-ISAC facility, a 500 MeV proton driver beam impinges onto different targets and induces nuclear reactions in them. The isotopes obtained in this way then diffuse out of the target material before they are ionized and extracted to form an isotope beam. Targets of uranium carbide with excess of graphite (UCx) are the most requested targets at TRIUMF. ARIEL, TRIUMF's flagship project, aims at increasing the radioactive isotope production capabilities to satisfy the growing demand of radioactive isotopes. The current production method of UCx targest does not have the means to supply enough UCx targets to satisfy ARIEL's demand, therefore, a new method for efficient UCx target material synthesis is being developed.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML131  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
FRXGBF2
Radioactive Ion Beams: A Global Overview of Facilities and New Techniques  
 
  • A. Gottberg
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The family of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities is growing and gaining capabilities with new projects in preparation at RISP (Korea), INFN-LNL (SPES), GSI (FAIR) and expanding facilities at ISAC (ARIEL), NSCL (FRIB), ISOLDE (HIE-Isolde), RIKEN (RIBF), ANL (Caribu) and others. The programs are based on the ISOL or fragmentation production techniques with added capabilities of gas-stopping and reacceleration for the fragment approach and the fragmentation of reaccelerated RIBs produced using the ISOL technique. Physics programs are broad with increasing interest in the development of theranostic ions for medical applications. This invited talk will give an overview of the global progress in developments and accelerator physics at radioactive beam facilities.  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)