03 Novel Particle Sources and Acceleration Technologies
A09 Muon Accelerators and Neutrino Factories
Paper Title Page
TUPML060 Three-Dimentional Spiral Beam Injection for a Compact Storage Ring 1673
 
  • H. Iinuma
    Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan
  • M.R. Abdul
    Sokendai, Ibaraki, Japan
  • Y. Fukao, K. Furukawa, H. Hisamatsu, T. Mibe, H. Nakayama, S. Ohsawa, K. Oide, K. Sasaki
    KEK, Tsukuba, Japan
 
  Funding: This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP26287055 and JP 23740216.
A newly developed three-dimensional spiral injection scheme for beam insertion into a compact (medical MRI size) solenoidal storage ring is introduced. This is a one of key R&D items for a new planned muon g-2/EDM experiment at J-PARC, which aims to measure g-2 to a factor 5 better statistical precision and a factor of 100 better sensitivity for the electric dipole moment measurement (EDM) compared to the previous experiments. The new scheme provides a smooth injection utilizing a radial solenoidal fringe field, without causing any error field in the storage volume. Magnetic pulsed kicker will guide and set the beam in the storage field volume. The strongest point of this new scheme is that any source of the electric field is removed in this scheme to perform ideal EDM measurement. We have performed a test bench experimental work to demonstrate a feasibility of this new injection scheme. Instead of the muon beam, we inject electron beam, from an electron-gun, into the solenoid magnet, and detect three-dimensional spiral beam trajectory inside of the storage chamber by CCD camera. We will discuss outline of a new injection scheme and the latest results from the test bench works.
*H. Iinuma et al.,Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 832, 51-62 (2016)
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML060  
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TUPML062 A Wedge Test in MICE 1680
 
  • T.A. Mohayai
    IIT, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • D.V. Neuffer
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • P. Snopok
    Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illlinois, USA
  • D.J. Summers
    UMiss, University, Mississippi, USA
 
  Emittance exchange mediated by wedge absorbers is required for longitudinal ionization cooling and for final transverse emittance minimization for a muon collider. A wedge absorber within the MICE cooling channel could serve as a demonstration of the type of emittance exchange needed for 6-D cooling, including the configurations needed for muon colliders. Parameters for this test have been explored in simulation and applied to experimental configurations using a wedge absorber in the MICE beam. A wedge absorber has been constructed and placed in MICE and data has been collected for both direct emittance exchange, where the longitudinal emittance decreases, and reverse emittance exchange, where the transverse emittance decreases. The simulation studies that led to the magnet configurations and beam configurations are presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML062  
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TUPML063 A Non-parameteric Density Estimation Approach to Measuring Beam Cooling in MICE 1684
SUSPF033   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • T.A. Mohayai
    IIT, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • D.V. Neuffer
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • P. Snopok
    Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illlinois, USA
 
  The goal of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is to demonstrate muon beam ionization cooling for the first time. It constitutes a key part of the R&D towards a future neutrino factory or muon collider. The intended MICE precision requires development of analysis tools that can account for any effects (e.g., nonlinearities) which may lead to inaccurate cooling measurements. Non-parametric density estimation techniques, in particular, kernel density estimation (KDE), allow very precise calculations of the muon beam phase-space density and its increase as a result of cooling. In this study, these density estimation techniques and their application to measuring the reduction in muon beam phase-space volume and amplitude in MICE are investigated.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML063  
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TUPML065 Phase Space Density Evolution in MICE 1692
 
  • D. Rajaram
    Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • V. Blackmore
    Imperial College of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, London, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: STFC, DOE, NSF, INFN, and CHIPP
The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) collaboration will demonstrate the feasibility of ionization cooling, the technique proposed to cool the muon beam at a future neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon beam parameters are measured before and after the cooling cell using high precision scintillating-fibre trackers in a solenoidal magnetic field. Position and momentum reconstruction of each muon in MICE allows the development of several alternative figures of merit in addition to emittance. Contraction of the phase-space volume of the sample, or equivalently the increase in phases-pace density at its core, is an unequivocal cooling signature. Single-particle amplitude, defined as a weighted distance to the sample centroid, can be used to probe the change in density in the core of the beam. Alternatively, non-parametric statistics provide reliable methods to estimate the entire phase-space density distribution and reconstruct probability contours. The aforementioned techniques, robust to transmission losses and sample non linearities, are ideal candidates for a cooling measurement in MICE. Preliminary results are presented here*.
*Submitted by the MICE Speakers bureau, to be prepared and presented by a MICE member to be selected in due course
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML065  
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TUPML066 Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices 1696
 
  • P. Snopok
    Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • J.S. Ellison
    IIT, Chicago, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by the Department of Energy.
New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the development of required simulation tools and their applications to studying the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML066  
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TUPML067 Recent Results from the Study of Emittance Evolution in MICE 1699
 
  • V. Blackmore
    Imperial College of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, London, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: STFC, DOE, NSF, INFN, and CHIPP
The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has measured the evolution of emittance due to ionization energy loss. Muons were focused onto an absorber using a large aperture solenoid. Lithium-hydride and liquid hydrogen-absorbers have been studied. Diagnostic devices were placed upstream and downstream of the focus, enabling the phase-space coordinates of individual muons to be reconstructed. By observing the properties of ensembles of muons, the change in beam emittance was measured. Data taken during 2016 and 2017 are currently under study to evaluate the change in emittance due to the absorber for muon beams with various initial emittance, momenta, and settings of the magnetic lattice. The current status and the most recent results of these analyses will be presented.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML067  
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TUPML068 The European Spallation Source Neutrino Super Beam Design Study 1702
 
  • M. Dracos
    IPHC, Strasbourg Cedex 2, France
 
  Funding: This project is now supported by the COST Action CA15139/EuroNuNet and EU/H2020 innovation programme ESSnuSB under grant agreement No 777419.
ESSnuSB proposes to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source (ESS) currently in construction in Lund (Sweden) to produce a very intense neutrino super beam, in parallel with the spallation neutron production. The ESS linac is expected to be operational by 2023 delivering 5 MW average power, 2 GeV proton beam, with 2.86 ms long pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. The primary proton beam-line completing the linac will consist of an accumulator ring to compress the beam pulses to 1.3 µs and a switchyard to distribute the protons onto the target station. The secondary beam-line producing neutrinos will consist of a four-horn/target station, a decay tunnel and a beam dump. A megaton scale water Cherenkov detector will be located at a baseline of about 500 km in one of the existing mines in Sweden and it will measure the neutrino oscillations. ESSnuSB was recently granted by the European H2020-INFRADEV program to start beginning of 2018 a 4-year design study on the feasibility of such facility. This paper presents the objectives, the steps and the organization of the ESSnuSB DS.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML068  
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THPML058 Recent Results from MICE on Multiple Coulomb Scattering and Energy Loss 4766
 
  • P. Franchini
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: STFC, DOE, NSF, INFN, and CHIPP
Multiple Coulomb scattering and energy loss are well known phenomena experienced by charged particles as they traverse a material. However, from recent measurements made by the MuScat collaboration, it is known that the available simulation codes (GEANT4, for example) overestimate the scattering of muons in low Z materials. This is of particular interest to the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment* (MICE) collaboration which has the goal of measuring the reduction of the emittance of a muon beam induced by energy loss in low Z absorbers. MICE took data without magnetic field suitable for multiple scattering measurements in the autumn of 2015 with the absorber vessel filled with xenon and in the spring of 2016 using a lithium-hydride absorber. In the autumn of 2016 MICE took data with magnetic fields on and studied the energy loss of muons in a lithium-hydride absorber. These data are all compared with the Bethe-Bloch formula and with the predictions of various models, including the default GEANT4 model.
*Submitted by the MICE Speakers bureau, to be prepared and presented by a MICE member to be selected in due course
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML058  
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FRXGBF1 Re-Acceleration of Ultra Cold Muon in J-PARC Muon Facility 5041
 
  • Y. Kondo, K. Hasegawa, T. Morishita
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken, Japan
  • S. Bae, H. Choi, S. Choi, B. Kim, H.S. Ko
    SNU, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Y. Fukao, K. Futatsukawa, N. Kawamura, T. Mibe, Y. Miyake, M. Otani, K. Shimomura, T. Yamazaki, M. Yoshida
    KEK, Tsukuba, Japan
  • N. Hayashizaki
    RLNR, Tokyo, Japan
  • T. Iijima, Y. Sue
    Nagoya University, Graduate School of Science, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Japan
  • H. Iinuma, Y. Nakazawa
    Ibaraki University, Ibaraki, Japan
  • K. Ishida
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
  • Y. Iwashita
    Kyoto ICR, Uji, Kyoto, Japan
  • Y. Iwata
    NIRS, Chiba-shi, Japan
  • R. Kitamura
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • S. Li
    The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Science, Tokyo, Japan
  • G.P. Razuvaev
    Budker INP & NSU, Novosibirsk, Russia
  • N. Saito
    J-PARC, KEK & JAEA, Ibaraki-ken, Japan
 
  Funding: This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP15H03666, JP16H03987, and JP16J07784.
J-PARC is developing the reacceleration system of the ultra slow (30 meV) muon (USM) obtained by two-photon laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms. The muon beam thus obtained has low emittance, meeting the requirement for the g-2/EDM experiment. J-PARC E34 experiment aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) with a precision of 0.1 ppm and search for EDM with a sensitivity to 10-21 e cm. The USM's are accelerated to 212 MeV by using a muon dedicated linac to be a ultra cold muon beam. The muon LINAC consists of an RFQ, a inter-digital H-mode DTL, disk and washer coupled cell structures, and disk loaded structures. The ultra-cold muons will have an extremely small transverse momentum spread of 0.1% with a normalized transverse emittance of around 1.5 pi mm-mrad. Proof of the slow muon acceleration scheme is an essential step to realize the world first muon linac. In October 2017, we have succeeded to accelerate slow negative muoniums generated using a simpler muonium source to 89 keV. In this talk, present design of the muon linac and the result of the world first muon acceleration experiment are reported.
 
slides icon Slides FRXGBF1 [8.378 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-FRXGBF1  
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