FRYGB —  Closing Plenaries   (04-May-18   10:50—12:20)
Chair: T.O. Raubenheimer, SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
Paper Title Page
FRYGB1
Review of FEL Science  
 
  • J. Yano
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  This invited talk will present a review of recent scientific highlights from X-ray FELs covering a broad range of disciplines including Structural Biology, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Photochemistry, Non-linear Spectroscopy, Shock Physics, and Solid Density Plasmas. The science achievements to date from these unique photon sources are already shaping our future.  
slides icon Slides FRYGB1 [63.270 MB]  
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FRYGB2
Applications of Compact Accelerators in Space for National Security  
 
  • B.E. Carlsten
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA
 
  Relativistic electrons can oscillate above the Earth trapped in the radiation belts (known as the Van Allen Belts). These electrons, which can originate from the solar wind or a high-altitude nuclear explosion, have the potential to damage satellites in low-Earth orbit. For example, in 1962, the US detonated the Starfire warhead at an altitude of about 400 km. The unexpected resulting enhancement of the radiation belts disabled several satellites within a few months and energetic electrons remained trapped in the radiation belts for up to several years. In order to address this potential vulnerability, schemes have been proposed to drain electrons from the radiation belts, with the most promising based on using high-power RF waves to couple to the trapped electrons. This talk will provide an overview of radiation belt remediation including the use of electron accelerators to drive these RF waves.  
slides icon Slides FRYGB2 [1.314 MB]  
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FRYGB3
Hidden Sectors: from Cosmos to Accelerators  
 
  • S. Gori
    UC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
 
  Cosmologists have determined that most of the matter in the universe is non luminous or "Dark". "Hidden sectors" refers to yet-unobserved quantum fields/particles that interact gravitationaly but not via the Standard Model gauge bosons. Some portion of the hidden sectors are candidates for dark matter. Speaker will make those connections, and then go on to a global survey low- and high-energy accelerator-based searches for hidden sector dark matter, both fixed-target and at colliders. Examples would include, but shall not be confined to, SPS and LHC (or HL-LHC), and beyond, etc.  
slides icon Slides FRYGB3 [24.339 MB]  
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FRYGB4
IPAC'19 Chair Closing Slides  
 
  • M.J. Boland
    CLS, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
 
  IPAC'19 Chair Closing Slides  
slides icon Slides FRYGB4 [24.718 MB]  
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