Keyword: ISAC
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MOXGB2 ARIEL at TRIUMF: Science and Technology TRIUMF, target, linac, cyclotron 6
 
  • J.A. Bagger, F. Ames, Y. Bylinskii, A. Gottberg, O.K. Kester, S.R. Koscielniak, R.E. Laxdal, M. Marchetto, P. Schaffer
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Hayashi
    TRIUMF Innovations Inc., Vancouver, Canada
 
  The Advanced Rare Isotope Laboratory (ARIEL) is TRIUMF's flagship project to create isotopes for science, medicine and business. ARIEL will triple TRIUMF's rare isotope beam capability, enabling more and new experiments in materials science, nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental symmetries, as well as the development of new isotopes for the life sciences. Beams from ARIEL's new 35 MeV, 100kW electron linear accelerator and from TRIUMF's original 500 MeV cyclotron will enable breakthrough experiments with the laboratory's suite of world-class experiments at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. This invited talk will present an overview of TRIUMF, the ARIEL project, and the exciting science they enable.  
slides icon Slides MOXGB2 [65.009 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOXGB2  
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THPAK112 Toward an End-to-End Model for ISAC-I Accelerators rfq, linac, simulation, TRIUMF 3500
 
  • O. Shelbaya, O.K. Kester
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Diurnal-like transmission variations in the ISAC-I warm accelerator system necessitates periodic retuning by operators. While beam loss points are well known, re-tuning nevertheless results in additional downtime and reduced count rates at experiments. This has motivated the development of an end-to-end simulation of the ISAC-I linear accelerator (linac) system to understand and characterize the nature of transmission instabilities spanning several hours to days.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAK112  
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THPAL117 Development of a Proton-to-Neutron Converter for Radioisotope Production at ISAC-TRIUMF target, proton, neutron, TRIUMF 3917
 
  • L. Egoriti, P.G. Bricault, T. Day Goodacre, A. Gottberg
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Delonca, R.M. Dos Santos Augusto, J.P. Ramos, S. Rothe, T. Stora
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Dierckx, D. Houngbo, L. Popescu
    SCK•CEN, Mol, Belgium
  • R.M. Dos Santos Augusto
    LMU, München, Germany
 
  At ISAC-TRIUMF, a 500 MeV proton beam is impinged upon thick targets to induce nuclear reactions to pro-duce reaction products that are delivered as a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) to experiments. Uranium carbide is among the most commonly used target materials which produces a vast radionuclide inventory coming from both spallation and fission- events. This can also represent a major limitation for the successful delivery of certain RIBs to experiments since, for a given mass, many isobar-ic isotopes are to be filtered by the dipole mass separator. These contaminants can exceed the yield of the isotope of interest by orders of magnitude, often causing a significant reduction in the sensitivity of experiments or even making them impossible. The design of a 50 kW proton-to-neutron (p2n) converter-target is ongoing to enhance the production of neutron-rich nuclei while significantly reducing the rate of neutron-deficient contaminants. The converter is made out of a bulk tungsten block which converts proton beams into neutrons through spallation. The neutrons, in turn, induce pure fission in an upstream UCx target. The present target design and the service infrastructure needed for its operation will be discussed in this paper.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL117  
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THPAL120 Cryogenics Infrastructure at TRIUMF's Particle Accelerator Facilities cryogenics, TRIUMF, SRF, operation 3925
 
  • A.N. Koveshnikov, Y. Bylinskii, G.W. Hodgson, D. Kishi, R.E. Laxdal, R.R. Nagimov, D. Yosifov
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.
Cryogenic infrastructure is an indispensable part of TRIUMF accelerator facilities. At the moment TRIUMF operates three helium cryogenic systems supporting operation of three major accelerator systems: 520 MeV proton cyclotron, superconductive radio-frequency (SRF) heavy ion linear accelerator at the Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) facility, and SRF electron linear accelerator (e-linac) at Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL). Applications of cryogenic thermal loads vary from cryogenic absorption pumping of the cyclotron vacuum tank to cryogenic cooling of superconducting (SC) RF cavities of production accelerators and support of research and development at SRF department. Wide range of production techniques for cryogenic refrigeration includes helium refrigerators based on both piston and turbine expansion coldboxes for both 4 K and 2 K temperature cryogenic loads. This paper presents the details of TRIUMF cryogenic systems as well as operational experience of various cryogenic installations.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL120  
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THPAL122 Beam Performance Study of an RF Structure to Accelerate or Bunch Low Energy Ion Beams booster, rfq, space-charge, bunching 3931
 
  • S.D. Rädel, S. Kiy, R.E. Laxdal, O. Shelbaya
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The 35.4MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) at the ISAC-I facility at TRIUMF is designed to accelerate ions from an energy of 2.04 keV/u to 150 keV/u for a large range of mass-to-charge ratios (A/Q). A multi-harmonic, 11.8MHz, buncher is used to provide a time focus at the RFQ entrance. Due to limits in the ion source HV platform a boost in the energy is required for higher mass beams (20 ≤ A/Q ≤ 30) to provide energy matching into the RFQ. To achieve this, a 3-gap, 11.8 MHz RF booster has been installed into the ISAC-I facility downstream of the buncher and upstream of the RFQ. The device can operate as an accelerator to match into the RFQ or as a second pre-buncher to improve capture in the RFQ and reduce sensitivity to space charge. Proof-of-principle measurements demonstrating various aspects of the performance will be reported and compared against expectations.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL122  
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THPML041 FEBIAD Ion Source Development at TRIUMF-ISAC target, emittance, ion-source, TRIUMF 4730
 
  • B.E. Schultz, F. Ames, O.K. Kester, P. Kunz, A. Mjøs, J.F. Sandor
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The ISOL facility TRIUMF-ISAC utilizes a number of different ion sources to produce radioactive ion beams. Most isotopes are ionized using surface or resonant laser ionization, but these techniques are prohibitively inefficient for species with high ionization energies, such as noble gases and molecules. For these cases, the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source can be used. The FEBIAD uses a hot cathode to produce electrons, which are accelerated through a potential (< 200 V) into the anode volume. Isotopes entering the resulting plasma undergo impact ionization and are extracted. Efforts are under way to better understand the physics and operation of the FEBIAD, using both theory and experiment. Recent measurements and simulations on the ISAC FEBIAD will be reported here.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML041  
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THPML081 Beam-Based Measurements of the ISAC-II Superconducting Heavy Ion Linac cavity, linac, alignment, TRIUMF 4841
 
  • S. Kiy, R.E. Laxdal, M. Marchetto, S.D. Rädel, O. Shelbaya
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Preparation for experiments, which typically run for one to two weeks in the ISAC-II facility at TRIUMF, requires some amount of overhead, limiting the efficiency of the facility. Efforts are underway to improve the ISAC-II linac model to reduce this overhead while also improving the quality of the delivered ion beam. This can be accomplished with beam-based measurements and corrections of alignment, cavity gradients, focal strengths, and more. A review of the present state of the linac will be given, including measured mis-alignments and other factors that affect the reproducibility of tunes. The outlook on expected improvements will also be summarized, including progress on the automatic phasing of cavities with a focus on integration to the High Level Application platform being developed at TRIUMF. Lastly, a summary will be given on the expected paradigm shift in the tuning approach taken: moving from re-active tuning by operators or beam delivery experts to pro-active measurements and investigations, version-controlled tunes, and continuous feedback from beam physicists.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML081  
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THPML082 Reflected Power Based Extremum Seeking Control Algorithm to Tune the Resonance Frequency of Room Temperature Cavities cavity, controls, resonance, TRIUMF 4844
 
  • R. Leewe, K. Fong, Z. Shahriari
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Moallem
    SFU, Surrey, Canada
 
  A sliding mode extremum seeking algorithm to tune the resonance frequency was implemented in two of TRIUMF's DTL tanks. The tuning algorithm searches for the minimum reflected power point and was developed to eliminate the highly temperature dependent phase measurement, which was previously used to tune the resonance frequency. Short and long term measurement results show that the tuning algorithm compensates for the RF heating effect as well as for diurnal temperature variations. Reflected power measurements of TRIUMF's DTL tank 3 were taken for both cases of operating the phase based tuning system and the reflected power based tuning system, with an outcome of a higher tuning accuracy of the newly developed system. Another advantage is a quick cavity start up time, as the reflected power based system does not rely on a reference set point which has do be adjusted manually. The sliding mode extremum seeking control loop is currently commissioned in further room temperature cavities of the TRIUMF's ISAC I facility.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML082  
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THPML131 A NEW PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR UCx TARGETS FOR RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE BEAMS AT TRIUMF vacuum, target, TRIUMF, ISOL 4990
 
  • M. S. Cervantes, P. Fouquet-Métivier, A. Gottberg, P. Kunz, L. Lambert, A. Mjøs, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. S. Cervantes
    UVIC, Victoria, Canada
  • P. Fouquet-Métivier
    ENSCM, Montpellier, France
  • A. Gottberg
    Victoria University, Victoria, B.C., Canada
 
  TRIUMF has the objective of producing radioactive isotope beams (RIB) using the ISOL method. Radioactive isotopes are used in experiments in different areas of science. At the TRIUMF-ISAC facility, a 500 MeV proton driver beam impinges onto different targets and induces nuclear reactions in them. The isotopes obtained in this way then diffuse out of the target material before they are ionized and extracted to form an isotope beam. Targets of uranium carbide with excess of graphite (UCx) are the most requested targets at TRIUMF. ARIEL, TRIUMF's flagship project, aims at increasing the radioactive isotope production capabilities to satisfy the growing demand of radioactive isotopes. The current production method of UCx targest does not have the means to supply enough UCx targets to satisfy ARIEL's demand, therefore, a new method for efficient UCx target material synthesis is being developed.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPML131  
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