Keyword: linear-collider
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MOPMF043 Tuning of CLIC-Final Focus System 3 TeV Baseline Design Under Static and Dynamic Imperfections luminosity, ISOL, collider, simulation 196
 
  • E. Marín, A. Latina, J. Pfingstner, D. Schulte, R. Tomás
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J. Pfingstner
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
 
  In this paper we present the tuning study of the Compact Linear Collider - Final Focus System (CLIC-FFS) 3~TeV baseline design under static and dynamic imperfections for the first time. The motion of the FFS magnets due to ground motion and the impact of active and passive mechanisms envisaged to stabilize both e- and e+ systems are described. It is found that the Pre-isolator required for stabilization of the Final Doublet drives the performance of the collider at the final stages of the tuning process. The obtained tuning performance depending on the stabilization techniques are discussed in detail.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPMF043  
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MOPML010 Challenges and Status of Tuning Simulations for CLIC Traditional Beam Delivery System luminosity, collider, simulation, lattice 412
 
  • R.M. Bodenstein, P. Burrows
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • E. Marín
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The beam delivery system (BDS) for the 3 TeV version of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has two main design types. One type is referred to as the local scheme, as it is approximately one kilometer shorter and corrects the chromaticity in both planes. The other type is referred to as the traditional scheme, and separates the chromaticity correction of each plane into different areas. The expectation early in the studies was that the traditional scheme would be easier to tune. This work will address the problems experienced in tuning simulations for the traditional BDS and describe the current state of these simulations.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-MOPML010  
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TUYGBE3 Recent progress of short pulse dielectric two-beam acceleration acceleration, collider, experiment, wakefield 640
 
  • J.H. Shao, M.E. Conde, D.S. Doran, W. Gai, W. Liu, N.R. Neveu, J.F. Power, C. Whiteford, E.E. Wisniewski, L.M. Zheng
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
  • C.-J. Jing
    Euclid TechLabs, LLC, Solon, Ohio, USA
 
  Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) is a structure-based wakefield acceleration method with the potential to meet the luminosity and cost requirements of a TeV class linear collider. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility is developing a dielectric-based short pulse TBA scheme with the potential to withstand high acceleration gradients and to achieve low fabrication cost. Recently, the dielectric short pulse TBA technology was successfully demonstrated using K-band 26 GHz structures, achieving 55 MW output power from the power extractor and 28 MeV/m gradient in the accelerator. To improve the generated rf power, an X-band 11.7 GHz power extractor has been developed, which obtained 105 MW in the high power test. In addition, a novel dielectric disk accelerator (DDA) is currently under investigation to significantly increase the efficiency of linear colliders based on short pulse TBA. Details of these research will be presented in this paper.  
slides icon Slides TUYGBE3 [2.224 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUYGBE3  
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TUPML005 Study of a Dielectric Disk Structure for Short Pulse Two-Beam Acceleration acceleration, impedance, collider, beam-loading 1539
 
  • J.H. Shao, M.E. Conde, D.S. Doran, J.F. Power
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
  • C.-J. Jing
    Euclid TechLabs, LLC, Solon, Ohio, USA
 
  Argonne Flexible Linear Collider (AFLC), a proposed 3 TeV electron-positron linear collider based on two-beam acceleration (TBA) scheme, applies a short pulse length (∼20 ns) to obtain a high accelerating gradient (267 MV/m) and a compact footprint (∼18 km). The baseline design of the main accelerator section adopts 26 GHz K-band traveling-wave dielectric-loaded accelerators (DLA) with an rf to beam efficiency 𝜂𝑟𝑓 −𝑏𝑒𝑎𝑚 of 27%. Recently, an alternative structure which is similar to a metallic disk-loaded one but with dielectric disks, noted as dielectric disk accelerator (DDA), has been investigated and optimized, leading to ∼45% improvement in 𝜂𝑟𝑓 −𝑏𝑒𝑎𝑚. To demonstrate the key technologies, an X-band prototype structure has been designed and will be tested at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility with a 300 MW metallic power extractor. Detailed comparison between K-band DLA and DDA for AFLC main accelerator as well as the preliminary design of the X-band DDA prototype will be presented in this paper.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML005  
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TUPML007 Short Pulse High Power RF Generation with an X-Band Dielectric Power Extractor experiment, simulation, acceleration, collider 1546
 
  • J.H. Shao, M.E. Conde, D.S. Doran, W. Gai, W. Liu, N.R. Neveu, J.F. Power, C. Whiteford, E.E. Wisniewski, L.M. Zheng
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
  • C.-J. Jing
    Euclid TechLabs, LLC, Solon, Ohio, USA
 
  Short pulse high power rf generation is one of the key technologies for the Argonne Flexible Linear Collider (AFLC), a proposed 3 TeV electron-positron linear collider based on two-beam acceleration (TBA) scheme. Compared with metallic power extractors, dielectric structures have the potential to achieve lower fabrication cost and to withstand higher gradient. Recently, an X-band dielectric power extractor (a.k.a, DPETS) has been developed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility and achieved 105 MW output power when driven by a high charge 8-bunch train separated by 770 ps. The design, the cold test measurement, the preliminary high power test results, and the structure inspection will be presented in this paper.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML007  
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TUPML036 ALEGRO, the Advanced LinEar collider study GROup collider, plasma, laser, acceleration 1619
 
  • P. Muggli
    MPI, Muenchen, Germany
  • B. Cros
    CNRS LPGP Univ Paris Sud, Orsay, France
 
  We briefly describe activities of ALEGRO, the Advanced LinEar collider study GROup.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-TUPML036  
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WEPAF075 Availability Allocation to Particle Accelerators Subsystems by Complexity Criteria factory, operation, collider, target 2009
 
  • O. Rey Orozko, A. Apollonio, M. Jonker, J.A. Uythoven
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  In the early design stages of an accelerator, an effective allocation method is needed to translate an overall accelerator availability goal into availability requirements for its subsystems. During the allocation process, many factors are considered to obtain so-called ‘complexity weights', which are at the basis of the system availability allocation. Some of these factors can be measured quantitatively while other have to be assessed qualitatively. Based on our analysis of factors affecting availability, we list six criteria for complexity resulting in an availability allocation of accelerator subsystems. System experts determine the scales of factors and relationships between subsystems. In this paper, we consider four availability apportionment techniques to allocate complexity weights to subsystems. Finally, we apply this method to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and we propose another application of the complexity weights to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-WEPAF075  
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WEPMF063 Thyratron Replacement* operation, klystron, high-voltage, collider 2512
 
  • I. Roth, N. Butler, M.P.J. Gaudreau, M.K. Kempkes, R.E. Simpson
    Diversified Technologies, Inc., Bedford, Massachusetts, USA
 
  Funding: Funded under US DOE grant no. DE-SC0011292.
Thyratrons are typically used as the switch in high power, short pulse modulators with pulse-forming networks. However, thyratrons have a lifetime of only ten to twenty thousand hours, their reservoir heater voltage needs to be adjusted periodically, and reduced overall demand has led multiple thyratron vendors to slow or cease production. In contrast, solid-state switches have a much longer lifetime, need no maintenance, and are based on widely-available commercial items. Despite these advantages, solid-state devices have not historically seen use, due to limited voltage, current, and risetime. Diversified Technologies, Inc. (DTI) has removed this barrier, having developed, built, and tested a thyratron-replacement switch for SLAC based on an array of series and parallel-connected commercial insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). This switch has demonstrated operation at very high voltage and current, meeting the full specifications required by SLAC to completely replace (form-fit-function-interface) the L-4888 thyratron: 48 kV, 6.3 kA, and 1 µs risetime.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-WEPMF063  
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THPAL155 Fabrication and Cold Test of the Correction Cavity Chain for Klystron-Based CLIC cavity, operation, polarization, klystron 4014
 
  • P. Wang, D.Z. Cao, H.B. Chen, J. Shi, Z.H. Wang, H. Zha
    TUB, Beijing, People's Republic of China
 
  A proposed RF scheme based on correction cavity chain and storage cavity (CC-SC scheme) for klystron-based CLIC has the ability to generate flat output pulses. In the scheme, the correction cavity chain modulates the amplitude of the input pulse, while the storage cavity compresses the amplitude-modulated pulse. Resonant cavities of the correction cavity chain are of a relatively low unloaded quality factor and of small size, which results in the compactness of the RF scheme. The first prototype of a correction cavity chain was fabricated and cold tested at Tsinghua University and then delivered to CERN for high power test. Both the results of the cold and high power tests show that the correction cavity chain is of good performance. Feasibility and stability of the pulse compression system based on CC-SC scheme were demonstrated.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPAL155  
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THPMK103 Initial Testing of Techniques for Large Scale Rf Conditioning for the Compact Linear Collider linac, operation, ECR, collider 4548
 
  • T.G. Lucas, M.J. Boland, P.J. Giansiracusa, R.P. Rassool, M. Volpi
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • N. Catalán Lasheras, A. Grudiev, T. Lefèvre, G. McMonagle, I. Syratchev, B.J. Woolley, W. Wuensch, V. del Pozo Romano
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J. Paszkiewicz
    University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • C. Serpico
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • A. Vnuchenko
    IFIC, Valencia, Spain
  • R. Zennaro
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
 
  Nominal operating conditions for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) 380 GeV requires 72 MV/m loaded accelerating gradients for a 180 ns flat-top pulse. Achieving this requires extensive RF conditioning which past tests have demonstrated can take several months per structure, when conditioned at the nominal repetition rate of 50 Hz. At CERN there are three individual X-band test stands currently operational, testing up to 6 structures concurrently. For CLIC's 380 GeV design, 28,000 accelerating structures will make up the main linac. For a large scale conditioning programme, it is important to understand the RF conditioning process and to optimise the time taken for conditioning. In this paper, we review recent X-band testing results from CERN's test stands. With these results we investigate how to optimise the conditioning process and demonstrate the feasibility of pre-conditioning the structures at a higher repetition rate before installation into the main linac.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2018-THPMK103  
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